Effect of Zea mays L. (Poaceae) starch slurry on the histopathological and biochemical changes in ethanol-induced ulcer and water immersion restrain stress-induced ulcer models in rats


Effect of Zea mays L. (Poaceae) starch slurry on the histopathological and biochemical changes in ethanol-induced ulcer and water immersion restrain stress-induced ulcer models in rats.

Isiogugu Ogechukwu Nnanyelugo1*, Ugwuoke Chiedozie Nickson, Okechukwu Gloria Ogonna, Oparaocha Rita Nnenne, Ugwu Francisca Onyinyechi, Peter Ikechukwu Emmanuel1, Ofokansi Martha Nneoma1, Alozie Eleazar Michael1, Abonyi Uchenna Collins1, Emencheta Stephen Chijeoke2, Ogbue Cyril Onyeka3

  1. Department of Pharmacoloqgy and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, 410001, Enugu State, Nigeria.
  2. Department of Pharmaceutical Microbiology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, 410001, Enugu State, Nigeria.
  3. Department of Pharmacognosy and Traditional Medicine, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria

 
 

Keywords; superoxide dismutase, malondialdehyde, Zea mays, ethanol-induced ulcer

 

 

 

 

*Corresponding author: ogechukwu.isiogugu@unn.edu.ng,

DOI: 10.48245/tnpr-2734391.2023.4.206

Page No: 90-106
Volume:4, Issue 2, 2023
Trends in Natural Products Research
Copy Right: NAPREG

Abstract

In this work, we further explored on our earlier findings by investigating the effect of Zea mays L. (Poaceae) starch slurry on histopathological and biochemical changes in ethanol-induced ulcer (EIU) and water immersion restrain stress-induced ulcer (WIRSIU) models in rat. The levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were also investigated in EIU and WIRSIU models in rats. In the EIU model, Zea mays starch slurry (ZM) increased the gastric SOD levels compared to the negative control group. The increase in SOD levels was significant (p < 0.001) and dose-dependent with the 5000 mg/kg eliciting the highest response (8.20 ± 0.25). When compared to the standard treatment, the 5000 mg/kg elicited a higher response. On the other hand, ZM produced decreased levels of MDA in EIU model in a dose-dependent manner (0.66 ± 0.17). In WIRSIU model, ZM also increased the SOD levels compared to the negative control group. The increase in SOD levels was significant (p < 0.05) and dose-dependent with the 5000 mg/kg eliciting the best response (3.13 ± 0.28). When compared to the standard treatment, the 5000 mg/kg elicited a somewhat similar response. Also, ZM produced decreased levels of MDA in WIRSIU which was also dose-dependent (1.20 ± 0.06). Upon histopathological examinations in both EIU and WIRSIU models, 5000 mg/kg of ZM showed a mild necrosis of the mucosal structures. The level of necrosis was dose-dependent with a higher dose showing a lesser necrosis and vice versa. Thus, from the present investigation, it can be concluded that Zea mays starch slurry afforded significant antiulcer activity by enhancing antioxidant potential of the gastric mucosa, thereby reducing mucosal damage.